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Archive for June, 2010

Abide by phrasal verb

Abide by something phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb abide is “abide” “abode/abided” “abided” “abides” “abiding”

This phrasal verb “Abide by Something” is used to mean “to accept or obey an agreement, rule, or decision.

Example: 1. Workers who refused to abide by the rules were fired.

2. They are all ready to abide by the decision, whichever it turns out to be.

Abound in/ with phrasal verb

Abound in/ with something phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb is “abound” “abounded” “abounded” “abounds” “abounding”

This phrasal verb “abound in/ with something” is used to mean “to contain a lot of something”

Example: 1. The place abound with Elephants and Lions.

2. The movies abound in crimes and legal cases.

Accede to phrasal verb

Accede to something phrasal verb

The conjugation of this verb is “accede” “acceded” “acceded” “accedes” “acceding”

The phrasal verb “Accede to something” is used to mean

1. To agree to something that someone has asked for (ex: demand, request), often after disagreeing with it first.

Example: 1. The government has finally acceded to the group’s demand for a separate state.

2. If someone accedes to the power or throne, that means they become king or queen, they take a position of power.

Example : 1. The rules were passed in 1950 when the king acceded to the throne.

2. The new king acceded to power in the last decade.

Accord with phrasal verb

Accord with something phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “accord” is “accord” “accorded” “accorded” “accords” “according”

This phrasal verb “Accord with something” is used to mean “to be the same as something, or to agree with something”.

Example: 1. The defendant’s version of events does not accord with the version of witness.

Account for phrasal verb

Account for something phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “Account” is “Account” “Accounted” “Accounted” “Accounts” “Accounting”

This phrasal verb “Account for something” is used to mean

1. to explain the reason for something or the cause of something

Example: 1. Can you account for your absence in the meeting?

Example: 2. He failed to account for over ten thousand dollars.

2. to form a particular amount of something

Example: 1. Teenagers account for over 50% of our customers.

Account for somebody phrasal verb

The phrasal verb “Account for somebody” is used to mean “to explain where someone is, especially if they are lost”.

Example: 1. The head of the group made no attempt to account for the missing member.

Ace out phrasal verb

Ace out somebody or ace somebody out phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “Ace” is “Ace” “Aced” “Aced” “Aces” “Acing”

The phrasal verb “Ace out somebody or Ace somebody out” is used to mean “to defeat someone.

Example: 1. The champion aced out the challenger very easily.

Ache for phrasal verb

Ache for somebody/ something phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “Ache” is “Ache” “Ached” “Ached” “Aches” “Aching”

The phrasal verb “Ache for Somebody/ Something” is used to mean “to want someone or something very much”.

Example: 1. They lay awake, their bodies aching for sleep.

Example: 2. After living two months apart, he was aching for her.

Act out phrasal verb

Act out something or act something out phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb act is “Act” “Acted” “Acted” “Acts” “Acting”

The phrasal verb “Act out something or act something out” is used to mean

1. to perform the actions and speech of a situation or story

Example: 1. The students were asked to act out a verse of their favorite poem.

2. to express your thoughts or emotions by using words or actions to represent them

Example: 1. He played a vast number of different characters to act out his repressed desires.

Act up phrasal verb

How To

June 17, 2010

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Act up phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “act” is “Act” “Acted” “Acted” “Acts” “Acting”

The phrasal verb Act up is used to mean

1. (This usage is slightly informal) If part of your body or a machine acts up, it stops working properly.

Example: 1. If my hands start acting up, I might have to skip my weight training from tomorrow.

Example: 2. My bike is acting up again, I must take it to the garage.

2. If someone, especially children, acts up, they behave badly.

Example: 1. The worst thing about kids is as soon as one of them starts acting up, the others follow.

3. (British English) To do a more important job than you usually do for a limited period.

Example: 1. New teaching staff are usually required to act up without any extra pay.

Add up phrasal verb

Add up something or Add something up phrasal verb

The conjugation of the main verb “Add” is “Add” “Added” “Added” “Adds” “Adding”

The phrasal verb “Add up (something) or Add (something) up” is used to mean “To calculate the total of two or more numbers”

Example: 1. Add all those figures up and it would amount $10,000.

Example: 2. The expenses adds up to more than 30 thousand.

Add up (This usage is never used in continuous tenses) (This usage is slightly informal)

The phrasal verb Add up is used to mean

1. to increase and become a large number or amount

Example: 1. If you save a few bucks every week, it will quickly add up to a large sum in a year.

2. to be a reasonable or likely explanation for something (This usage is often used in negative contexts.

Example: 2. She says she doesn’t like them and yet goes to places with them, Her behavior just doesn’t add up.